Sustainability

Sustainable Food Systems and Educational Farms at Learning Garden's Lab Site. The time is ripe to be part of the growing sustainable food movement! This class addresses the current food issues that face urban citizens by holistically engaging students in the many layers of Portland's local food and farm culture.  Students will critically analyze the state of our current food systems while being engaged in positive solutions to agricultural-related issues. The community partner and classroom is the Learning Gardens Lab, where students will gain hands-on farming experience, experientially explore their personal connection to food and the land, participate in the Learning Garden programs, and positively contribute to food security in our greater community.

Environmental Justice and Salmon. The Columbia river flows through our region in physical and metaphorical ways. Present in the story of the river and the salmon that navigate it are social issues, history and conflict that continue to impact NW communities. Through a place-based, experiential approach we will engage this content. Over the course of the term we will spend the majority of our class time outside of the classroom near the river and at sites of cultural or geologic importance.

Grantwriting for Environmental Defense. Environmentalism is a philosophy and social movement (come call it a revolution) involving both protection and improvement of the health of our natural environment. Environmentalism is an attempt to achieve sustainability so that both humans and the Earth thrive without compromising future generations. The movement in this country is credited as starting with Rachel Carson and her extremely popular book Silent Spring published in 1962, when it fact it was spawned in 1945 with the return of soldiers from World War II and the creation of suburbs that caused issues with sewage, storm water runoff, nonpoint source pollution, and inefficient energy sources.

This course will partner with Portland’s Community Cycling Center, helping them increase their capacity by developing grants for specific projects. The Community Cycling Center works to broaden access to bicycling and the benefits of cycling. Their vision is to build a vibrant community where people of all backgrounds use bicycles to stay healthy and connected. In order to write a successful grant proposal, one must gather up as much knowledge about the topic and the organization as possible.

The goal of this course is to provide students professional skills for grant proposal writing in the field of language diversity and sustainability. Along with the proposal writing skills, the students will learn a solid background in historical and societal issues that influence language diversity through hands-on collaboration with current language sustainability efforts. This capstone partners with one of the endangered language communities in the Northwest, specifically, the Warm Springs Tribal Language Program.

Quality Assurance for Volunteer Stream Monitoring.

Science Background Not Required.

This course is designed to give students an opportunity to learn about and become involved in urban sustainability projects and organizations in Portland, OR.  Students will be introduced to basic concepts and practices related to urban sustainability and understand how social, ecological and technological issues are interlinked.  Students will then directly participate in a sustainability project that will provide a base of experience for furthering the learning and appreciation for the challenges and opportunities to making our cities more sustainable.  This Capstone builds on a number of

This class will involve students in monitoring the ecological impacts of backyard habitats that are near Portland parks. Students will work in teams in particular targeted neighborhoods. They will monitor some of the following: native and non-native plants, birds, and insects. They will learn about the ecology behind backyard restoration, the procedure for establishing backyard habitats, and assist as residents implement new habitats.

Sustainable Living. In light of looming environmental crises, what can individuals do to change direction? In this course we collectively examine our society to determine which cultural values support, and which inhibit, sustainability. Working with established green teams and enrichment programs, students develop and facilitate sustainability activities for youth. Our partner groups, The Northwest Earth Institute (NWEI) and the Center For Earth Leadership (CERL) empower individuals and organizations to transform culture toward a sustainable and enriching future.

Grant Writing for the Bicycle Transportation Alliance  Grant writing skills are critical to the survival of non-profit organizations. In this course, we partner with Portland’s Bicycle Transportation Alliance (BTA) to help them increase their capacity by developing grants for specific projects. The BTA (http://www.bta4bikes.org/) works to promote bicycling and improve bicycling conditions in Oregon and SW Washington.

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