Archive

Use this to make a course not appear in the search results.

Active: 
yes

Help with the decline in music education programs in area elementary schools by developing and teaching lessons dealing with music: for example, "The Science of Music", the "History of Music", "Music around the World", or lessons dealing with rhythm, notation, and other musical specifics.

Course Learning Objectives:  Students will…

JEAN's Urban Educational Farm Site: M/W 8:15am-10:45am

 

Classroom topics will include immigration, socio cultural behavior, and workforce development.  Students will assist a non-profit workforce development or social services agency.  Outside of class, students will tutor or teach ESL for immigrants as they transition to life in the U.S, or complete other projects related to immigration.

LGBTQ History

Learn about local queer history from the folks who paved the way and help preserve their stories.   Our community partner is the Gay and Lesbian Archives of the Pacific Northwest (GLAPN).  Help GLAPN save our history by doing an oral history/interview of an elder member of the community.  GLAPN selects the folks students will interview.  Students will work in pairs for the interview.  Before the interview, students will learn about local queer history including anti-gay ballot initiatives, early gay-rights groups, and social groups.  Students will also examine original sources (such as old newspapers, fliers, newsletters, etc.) and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using oral histories and original sources to save local queer history.

Engaging Democracy

This Capstone takes place over the winter and spring term, and is only offered every other year, when the Oregon Legislature has a full session.  One of the most pressing problems in American politics today is that the public feels increasingly distant from elected leaders. To many reformers, the health of the nation’s democracy can only improve by getting more young people involved in politics. The Engaging Democracy capstone addresses this problem by having students assist Oregon legislators during the long legislative session in odd calendar years in Salem, where they will help handle the broad range of responsibilities placed on legislative staff. During classroom times, students will learn about the position of legislatures in American politics and the character of Oregon politics. As a final project, the students will work together on a web-based guide to the Legislative Assembly. The work in the capitol will be arranged around each individual student’s schedule. Carpooling should be available. It is likely we will have some funds to offset travel costs.

Pages