Spring 2020

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GirlPower! 

In this course, we will be working with our community partner, the local non-profit organization; the IPRC, Independent Publishing Resource Center.  Our project is to coordinate a series of *rap sessions* with local teen girls about current issues in their lives. We will use these group conversations to encourage the girls to become a part of our ZINE project - where they will write, edit, and publish a grassroots, mini-magazine with our class.  In preparation for this project, we will read feminist scholarship about teenage girls as well as focus groups and zine publishing methodologies.

 

 

 

Cultivating Leadership Capacity and Promoting Educational Equity

Tryon Creek: Cultural And Ecological Education. Students will participate in interpretive programs facilitated within the Tryon Creek State Natural Area.

 

 

 

 

Queer & Trans Youth

It is estimated that 1 in 10 individuals identify as a sexual minority. Often an already challenging stage in identity development, gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender & questioning (LGBTQ) youth face a set of issues unique to their daily lives.

Juvenile Justice Capstone Group PhotoJuvenile Justice

This Capstone partners with the Multnomah County Department of Community Justice, Juvenile Services Division.  Students work together to facilitate a writing/art workshop in juvenile detention. Through your work in the detention facility, as well as through supportive academic activities, you will have the opportunity to deeply explore current issues in juvenile justice.

 

 

 

Mentoring & Empowerment at NAYA

This class is an opportunity to explore hands-on the complexity surrounding education, equity, and empowerment, with a specific focus on collaborative peer mentoring, which often includes academic tutoring. Our community partner is the Native American Youth and Family Center (NAYA). At NAYA, students will have the opportunity to interact with bright youth from diverse cultures and work with them on improving their academics and future prospects.

 

Image of forest trail with man kneeling to look closely at moss along the trail. The image is overlayed with various icons created through the Virtual Field Environment (VFE) tour software.

Effective Change Agent

This course is for students interested in being effective change agents for the public good. Each student (individually or with others) will take the initiative before the Capstone begins to arrange a project with a community organization. This project may be an existing relationship or one sought for the purpose of this class.

 

 

Tutoring Adult ESL

Capstone students will work with adult English as Second Language learners for 2.5 to three hours a week at local community colleges (locations and times vary). Capstone students must be proficient speakers of English but are not required to be native English speakers. 


Coursework involves strategies for tutoring ESL/ABE, intercultural communications, and issues pertaining to immigration.  

This course will present opportunities for students to:

  • Apply practical skills and strategies in tutoring English Language Learners
  • Expand their understanding and ability to participate in cross-cultural communication while interacting with limited-English speakers.
  • Understand the political, social, and economic implications of immigration in the United States.
  • Think critically about social responsibility as it pertains to living among people from various cultures.

LGBTQ History

Learn about local queer history from the folks who paved the way and help preserve their stories.   Our community partner is the Gay and Lesbian Archives of the Pacific Northwest (GLAPN).  Help GLAPN save our history by doing an oral history/interview of an elder member of the community.  GLAPN selects the folks students will interview.  Students will work in pairs for the interview.  Before the interview, students will learn about local queer history including anti-gay ballot initiatives, early gay-rights groups, and social groups.  Students will also examine original sources (such as old newspapers, fliers, newsletters, etc.) and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using oral histories and original sources to save local queer history.

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