Spring 2021

Active: 
yes

Tutoring Adult ESL

Capstone students will work with adult English as Second Language learners for 2.5 to three hours a week at local community colleges (locations and times vary). Capstone students must be proficient speakers of English but are not required to be native English speakers. 


Coursework involves strategies for tutoring ESL/ABE, intercultural communications, and issues pertaining to immigration.  

This course will present opportunities for students to:

  • Apply practical skills and strategies in tutoring English Language Learners
  • Expand their understanding and ability to participate in cross-cultural communication while interacting with limited-English speakers.
  • Understand the political, social, and economic implications of immigration in the United States.
  • Think critically about social responsibility as it pertains to living among people from various cultures.

Equal Access for Justice

A comprehensive and engaging examination of contemporary multicultural and cross-cultural imperatives, this capstone explores the barriers to justice for ethnic and racial minorities. Special attention will be given to the U.S. institutional structure and the justice system. Utilizing a progressive and proactive approach, students will acquire a deeper understanding, awareness and appreciation  of  the root causes of the existing disparities. Their learning outcome will be enhanced through design and formulation of proactive solutions to secure fairness, equity and justice for all.

Engaging Democracy

This Capstone takes place over the winter and spring term, and is only offered every other year, when the Oregon Legislature has a full session.  One of the most pressing problems in American politics today is that the public feels increasingly distant from elected leaders. To many reformers, the health of the nation’s democracy can only improve by getting more young people involved in politics. The Engaging Democracy capstone addresses this problem by having students assist Oregon legislators during the long legislative session in odd calendar years in Salem, where they will help handle the broad range of responsibilities placed on legislative staff. During classroom times, students will learn about the position of legislatures in American politics and the character of Oregon politics. As a final project, the students will work together on a web-based guide to the Legislative Assembly. The work in the capitol will be arranged around each individual student’s schedule. Carpooling should be available. It is likely we will have some funds to offset travel costs.

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