food; food insecurity; hunger; sustainability

Food Justice, Food Sovereignty, and Sustainability: This course will focus on the themes of food justice and sovereignty and how we can create just and sustainable change in our food systems. Students will explore food heritage, food justice and sovereignty, sustainability, sustainability leadership, and form emergent strategies in implementing food systems that embrace these concepts. Students will learn basic gardening skills and reflect on their time in the garden in connection with assigned readings and class discussions. A community service project will take place throughout the course, complementing the learning and experiences students gain from this capstone. This course partners with the Wombyn's Wellness Garden at the Oregon Food Bank, an indigenous led garden that grows food and medicine for the Portland native community and beyond.

This course will focus on how we can create sustainable and just change in our food system and beyond. Students will explore the concepts of sustainability, sustainability leadership, food justice, and food sovereignty through community-based learning with the Wombyn's Wellness Garden (WWG) at the Oregon Food Bank. This course will focus on community building, group discussions and activities, and will work on projects that support the mission of the WWG. For Spring Term 2021, this course will be fully remote with the option to attend in-person meetings at the WWG (depending on Oregon's Covid policies). Optional in-person meetings will happen at the WWG on Mondays from 10am-12pm and synchronous Zoom meetings will happen on Wednesdays from 10am-12pm. The WWG is located at the Oregon Food Bank site at 7900 NE 33rd Drive Portland OR 97266.

Learning Gardens, Sustainability, and Food Sovereignty at Oregon Food Bank - This course will explore sustainability and food sovereignty through community engagement at the Oregon Food Bank and Wombyn’s Wellness Garden

When you hear the terms "hunger" or "food insecurity," you may not immediately think of college students and a university setting, but a significant percentage of college students are struggling with challenges to meet their nutritional, quality, and quantity food needs. The percentage of university students that are deemed "food insecurity" is approximately three to four times the national average or surrounding population percentage.